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PODS Trauma Training

PODS is a leading provider of CPD training on trauma, dissocation, sexual abuse and attachment. We run training days throughout the year in various locations around the country.

All of our days are led by Carolyn Spring, Director of PODS and author of Recovery is my best revenge: my experience of trauma, abuse and dissociative identity disorder.

Delegates from a wide range of backgrounds and sectors attend our training, this includes:

  • counsellors
  • psychotherapists
  • psychologists
  • rape crisis or helpline staff and volunteers
  • CPNs / healthcare staff
  • police, prison and probation staff
  • social care staff
  • education staff
  • survivors
  • supporters
  • anyone working with people who have suffered trauma in childhood

Courses

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Workshops

Workshop

(Huntingdon) Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma

We know that trauma profoundly affects our body. That was the primary focus of my course ‘Trauma and the Body’. We looked at how trauma greatly increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and some autoimmune disorders. We looked at body memories and how our experience of pain is influenced by our psychological state.

But what about the flip side of all of that? How does the state of our body influence our mind and emotions?

That’s what I’m going to be looking at in a new course, launching in September 2019, called ‘Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma’. I’m going to be delving into some cutting-edge research and thinking about how our mental health – things like our mood, our emotions, even our compulsions – are at least in part driven by our physiology. We’ll be looking at how the bacteria in our gut may influence our mental state; how depression and anxiety may be generated by inflammation and our immune system; how our hormones impact how we feel and act; and how even what time we get up on a morning can set the course of our emotions throughout the day. We’ll look in more detail at chronic fatigue syndrome and why adolescents and menopausal women as age groups are at the highest risk of mental health difficulties and suicide. And lots more!

We all know instinctively that our bodies influence our brains, and our brains influence our bodies, but we don’t always know why. That’s what I’m going to be unpacking in this course, to see if, in our fight against trauma, there are other tools and strategies that we can use, on top of our standard talking therapies approaches.

This is going to be a fascinating day and as always it will be rooted in a combination of the latest research alongside my own journey: from years battling chronic fatigue syndrome and DID to vastly improved health, both physically and mentally.

At the end of this course, my goal is that we’ll all have a much clearer idea of what we can do to help both ourselves and our clients be in the best shape possible, both mentally and physically, so that recovery from trauma isn’t just a pipe-dream, but a solid plan.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

The speaker is Carolyn Spring.

Workshop

(London) Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma

We know that trauma profoundly affects our body. That was the primary focus of my course ‘Trauma and the Body’. We looked at how trauma greatly increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and some autoimmune disorders. We looked at body memories and how our experience of pain is influenced by our psychological state.

But what about the flip side of all of that? How does the state of our body influence our mind and emotions?

That’s what I’m going to be looking at in a new course, launching in September 2019, called ‘Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma’. I’m going to be delving into some cutting-edge research and thinking about how our mental health – things like our mood, our emotions, even our compulsions – are at least in part driven by our physiology. We’ll be looking at how the bacteria in our gut may influence our mental state; how depression and anxiety may be generated by inflammation and our immune system; how our hormones impact how we feel and act; and how even what time we get up on a morning can set the course of our emotions throughout the day. We’ll look in more detail at chronic fatigue syndrome and why adolescents and menopausal women as age groups are at the highest risk of mental health difficulties and suicide. And lots more!

We all know instinctively that our bodies influence our brains, and our brains influence our bodies, but we don’t always know why. That’s what I’m going to be unpacking in this course, to see if, in our fight against trauma, there are other tools and strategies that we can use, on top of our standard talking therapies approaches.

This is going to be a fascinating day and as always it will be rooted in a combination of the latest research alongside my own journey: from years battling chronic fatigue syndrome and DID to vastly improved health, both physically and mentally.

At the end of this course, my goal is that we’ll all have a much clearer idea of what we can do to help both ourselves and our clients be in the best shape possible, both mentally and physically, so that recovery from trauma isn’t just a pipe-dream, but a solid plan.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

The speaker is Carolyn Spring.

Workshop

(Leeds) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

Workshop

(Bristol) Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma

We know that trauma profoundly affects our body. That was the primary focus of my course ‘Trauma and the Body’. We looked at how trauma greatly increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and some autoimmune disorders. We looked at body memories and how our experience of pain is influenced by our psychological state.

But what about the flip side of all of that? How does the state of our body influence our mind and emotions?

That’s what I’m going to be looking at in a new course, launching in September 2019, called ‘Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma’. I’m going to be delving into some cutting-edge research and thinking about how our mental health – things like our mood, our emotions, even our compulsions – are at least in part driven by our physiology. We’ll be looking at how the bacteria in our gut may influence our mental state; how depression and anxiety may be generated by inflammation and our immune system; how our hormones impact how we feel and act; and how even what time we get up on a morning can set the course of our emotions throughout the day. We’ll look in more detail at chronic fatigue syndrome and why adolescents and menopausal women as age groups are at the highest risk of mental health difficulties and suicide. And lots more!

We all know instinctively that our bodies influence our brains, and our brains influence our bodies, but we don’t always know why. That’s what I’m going to be unpacking in this course, to see if, in our fight against trauma, there are other tools and strategies that we can use, on top of our standard talking therapies approaches.

This is going to be a fascinating day and as always it will be rooted in a combination of the latest research alongside my own journey: from years battling chronic fatigue syndrome and DID to vastly improved health, both physically and mentally.

At the end of this course, my goal is that we’ll all have a much clearer idea of what we can do to help both ourselves and our clients be in the best shape possible, both mentally and physically, so that recovery from trauma isn’t just a pipe-dream, but a solid plan.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

The speaker is Carolyn Spring.

Workshop

(Nottingham) Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma

We know that trauma profoundly affects our body. That was the primary focus of my course ‘Trauma and the Body’. We looked at how trauma greatly increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and some autoimmune disorders. We looked at body memories and how our experience of pain is influenced by our psychological state.

But what about the flip side of all of that? How does the state of our body influence our mind and emotions?

That’s what I’m going to be looking at in a new course, launching in September 2019, called ‘Mental Health and the Body: Treating Trauma’. I’m going to be delving into some cutting-edge research and thinking about how our mental health – things like our mood, our emotions, even our compulsions – are at least in part driven by our physiology. We’ll be looking at how the bacteria in our gut may influence our mental state; how depression and anxiety may be generated by inflammation and our immune system; how our hormones impact how we feel and act; and how even what time we get up on a morning can set the course of our emotions throughout the day. We’ll look in more detail at chronic fatigue syndrome and why adolescents and menopausal women as age groups are at the highest risk of mental health difficulties and suicide. And lots more!

We all know instinctively that our bodies influence our brains, and our brains influence our bodies, but we don’t always know why. That’s what I’m going to be unpacking in this course, to see if, in our fight against trauma, there are other tools and strategies that we can use, on top of our standard talking therapies approaches.

This is going to be a fascinating day and as always it will be rooted in a combination of the latest research alongside my own journey: from years battling chronic fatigue syndrome and DID to vastly improved health, both physically and mentally.

At the end of this course, my goal is that we’ll all have a much clearer idea of what we can do to help both ourselves and our clients be in the best shape possible, both mentally and physically, so that recovery from trauma isn’t just a pipe-dream, but a solid plan.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

The speaker is Carolyn Spring.

Workshop

(Crawley) Working with Shame

Shame. It’s universal. In our survey, 99% of counsellors and therapists said that they had worked with clients experiencing shame. We all know about shame, we all know what it feels like, but what actually is it? How is it different from guilt? What purpose does it serve? What problem does it solve? How does it manifest in, and how is it affected by, our neurobiology? Most importantly, how can we work with it to alleviate it?

Shame can be the single biggest hindrance to making progress in therapy, recovering from trauma, building positive relationships, and moving forwards with life. Shame stops us in our tracks. Rather than utilising active strategies to overcome our obstacles, shame causes us to huddle up, crouch down, freeze, and make ourselves invisible. It has a protective function, but one which can end up as a self-reinforcing loop: a vicious cycle.

Shame is the often unconscious belief that there is something fundamentally wrong with us as people – that we are ‘bad’. We often cannot define that badness, or even determine its cause. It just is. And that’s what makes shame so difficult to deal with. It lurks below the surface of consciousness, infecting everything we do and everything we feel, and often remaining frustratingly out of reach. It is not unusual for people to struggle with shame for years and even decades, nullifying progress that they may be making in other areas. For survivors of child sexual abuse, shame is a kind of universal, identifying characteristic. And for survivors of other kinds of trauma, shame is never far away: if not shame at what happened, then shame at how we responded. Shame and the freeze response go hand-in-hand.

And yet shame has its roots in our evolution and is not an accident. Could it be that shame actually serves to protect us? Could shame, approached in the right way, be our friend?

Shame convinces us that we do not belong: that we don’t fit in, that we’re not acceptable, and that there is nothing we can do about it, because shame doesn’t arise because of what we’ve done, but because of who we are. And if we’re bad, surely we’re just bad – what can we do about it?

How does modern-day society contribute to the shame-game? How has the rise of social media, victim-blaming and trolling both contributed to shame, and been driven by it? What are the links between shame and mental health? What about the links between shame and physical sickness?

What is the way out of shame? What is the answer? Do we fight it, or roll with it? Do we require empathy and compassion from others to alleviate it, or do we need courage and self-compassion from ourselves? What’s the answer?

This course will look at the good, the bad and the ugly of shame, how it manifests – especially in a therapeutic setting – and how we can work with it. Aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also relevant to other helping professions as well as people recovering from trauma, this course will take a trauma-informed, neurobiological approach to the issue of shame and look at how transformation really is possible. Led by Carolyn Spring, this course will combine the latest insights from clinical literature and research alongside neuroscience research and Carolyn’s own journey of recovery from trauma, and from a place where she was utterly crippled by shame (to the point of suicide) to where she now stands up to speak, without shame, to thousands of people each year.

Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course. The speaker is Carolyn Spring.

Conferences

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Open Days

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Online

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