PODS Trauma Training

PODS is a leading provider of CPD training on trauma, dissocation, sexual abuse and attachment. We run training days throughout the year in various locations around the country.

All of our days are led by Carolyn Spring, Director of PODS and author of Recovery is my best revenge: my experience of trauma, abuse and dissociative identity disorder.

Delegates from a wide range of backgrounds and sectors attend our training, this includes:

  • counsellors
  • psychotherapists
  • psychologists
  • rape crisis or helpline staff and volunteers
  • CPNs / healthcare staff
  • police, prison and probation staff
  • social care staff
  • education staff
  • survivors
  • supporters
  • anyone working with people who have suffered trauma in childhood

CoursesCourses

(Nottingham) Working with Dissociative Disorders in Clinical Practice

Start date: Friday, 5 October 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: Westgate Suites, Nottingham
This training builds on previous courses by Carolyn Spring but presents fresh insights into working with clients who have a history of repeated childhood trauma and/or are presenting with chronic dissociative symptoms and/or a dissociative disorder. Often referred to as ‘complex’ by the polite and ‘difficult’, ‘challenging’, ‘revolving-door’ and ‘borderline’ by the less polite, these clients do present many challenges, but their behaviours and symptoms are entirely logical in the light of their early life history, and this course will help to shed light on how to work effectively with them in order to progress towards recovery – a life that is no longer dominated by trauma responses.

This course will look at the burning questions that so many therapists have when working with this client group, including:

* How should you engage with ‘parts’?
* How can you avoid ‘retraumatising’ the client?
* How do you work with the client who can’t properly remember the trauma?
* What do you do with the client who cannot stay present during a session?
* How do you deal with dependency?
* Is integration the goal?
* How do you pace sessions?
* What do you do if you can’t get the adult ‘back’ at the end of a session?
* How do you deal with stuckness?
* How do you avoid traumatic reenactments within the therapy room and the therapy relationship?
* What pitfalls are there in this work?
* How do you look after yourself whilst working with such demanding and at times overwhelming content and trauma?
* How do you deal effectively and empathically with self-harm and suicidality?
* How do you process traumatic memories?
* Do you allow the client to ‘switch’ or do you keep the ‘adult’ present?
* And many other questions

(Nottingham) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 6 October 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: Westgate Suites, Nottingham
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Bristol) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Friday, 12 October 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: Vassall Centre, Bristol
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Peterborough) Working with Dissociative Disorders in Clinical Practice

Start date: Friday, 9 November 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: National Centre for Deafblindness, Peterborough
This training builds on previous courses by Carolyn Spring but presents fresh insights into working with clients who have a history of repeated childhood trauma and/or are presenting with chronic dissociative symptoms and/or a dissociative disorder. Often referred to as ‘complex’ by the polite and ‘difficult’, ‘challenging’, ‘revolving-door’ and ‘borderline’ by the less polite, these clients do present many challenges, but their behaviours and symptoms are entirely logical in the light of their early life history, and this course will help to shed light on how to work effectively with them in order to progress towards recovery – a life that is no longer dominated by trauma responses.

This course will look at the burning questions that so many therapists have when working with this client group, including:

* How should you engage with ‘parts’?
* How can you avoid ‘retraumatising’ the client?
* How do you work with the client who can’t properly remember the trauma?
* What do you do with the client who cannot stay present during a session?
* How do you deal with dependency?
* Is integration the goal?
* How do you pace sessions?
* What do you do if you can’t get the adult ‘back’ at the end of a session?
* How do you deal with stuckness?
* How do you avoid traumatic reenactments within the therapy room and the therapy relationship?
* What pitfalls are there in this work?
* How do you look after yourself whilst working with such demanding and at times overwhelming content and trauma?
* How do you deal effectively and empathically with self-harm and suicidality?
* How do you process traumatic memories?
* Do you allow the client to ‘switch’ or do you keep the ‘adult’ present?
* And many other questions

(Peterborough) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 10 November 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: National Centre for Deafblindness, Peterborough
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(London) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Friday, 23 November 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: Amnesty International, London
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Manchester) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Friday, 30 November 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: St Thomas Centre, Manchester
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Manchester) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 1 December 2018 @ 10:00
Venue: St Thomas Centre, Manchester
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(London) Working with Dissociative Disorders in Clinical Practice

Start date: Saturday, 26 January 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: Amnesty International, London
This training builds on previous courses by Carolyn Spring but presents fresh insights into working with clients who have a history of repeated childhood trauma and/or are presenting with chronic dissociative symptoms and/or a dissociative disorder. Often referred to as ‘complex’ by the polite and ‘difficult’, ‘challenging’, ‘revolving-door’ and ‘borderline’ by the less polite, these clients do present many challenges, but their behaviours and symptoms are entirely logical in the light of their early life history, and this course will help to shed light on how to work effectively with them in order to progress towards recovery – a life that is no longer dominated by trauma responses.

This course will look at the burning questions that so many therapists have when working with this client group, including:

* How should you engage with ‘parts’?
* How can you avoid ‘retraumatising’ the client?
* How do you work with the client who can’t properly remember the trauma?
* What do you do with the client who cannot stay present during a session?
* How do you deal with dependency?
* Is integration the goal?
* How do you pace sessions?
* What do you do if you can’t get the adult ‘back’ at the end of a session?
* How do you deal with stuckness?
* How do you avoid traumatic reenactments within the therapy room and the therapy relationship?
* What pitfalls are there in this work?
* How do you look after yourself whilst working with such demanding and at times overwhelming content and trauma?
* How do you deal effectively and empathically with self-harm and suicidality?
* How do you process traumatic memories?
* Do you allow the client to ‘switch’ or do you keep the ‘adult’ present?
* And many other questions

(Birmingham) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Friday, 1 February 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: The Bridge, Shirley, Birmingham
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Birmingham) Working with Dissociative Disorders in Clinical Practice

Start date: Saturday, 2 February 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: The Bridge, Shirley, Birmingham
This training builds on previous courses by Carolyn Spring but presents fresh insights into working with clients who have a history of repeated childhood trauma and/or are presenting with chronic dissociative symptoms and/or a dissociative disorder. Often referred to as ‘complex’ by the polite and ‘difficult’, ‘challenging’, ‘revolving-door’ and ‘borderline’ by the less polite, these clients do present many challenges, but their behaviours and symptoms are entirely logical in the light of their early life history, and this course will help to shed light on how to work effectively with them in order to progress towards recovery – a life that is no longer dominated by trauma responses.

This course will look at the burning questions that so many therapists have when working with this client group, including:

* How should you engage with ‘parts’?
* How can you avoid ‘retraumatising’ the client?
* How do you work with the client who can’t properly remember the trauma?
* What do you do with the client who cannot stay present during a session?
* How do you deal with dependency?
* Is integration the goal?
* How do you pace sessions?
* What do you do if you can’t get the adult ‘back’ at the end of a session?
* How do you deal with stuckness?
* How do you avoid traumatic reenactments within the therapy room and the therapy relationship?
* What pitfalls are there in this work?
* How do you look after yourself whilst working with such demanding and at times overwhelming content and trauma?
* How do you deal effectively and empathically with self-harm and suicidality?
* How do you process traumatic memories?
* Do you allow the client to ‘switch’ or do you keep the ‘adult’ present?
* And many other questions

(Darlington) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 2 March 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: Morton Park Business Training Centre, Darlington
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Crawley) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 9 March 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: The Charis Centre, Crawley
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

(Exeter) Dealing with Distress: Working with Self-Harm and Suicide

Start date: Saturday, 16 March 2019 @ 10:00
Venue: Broadclyst Victory Hall, Exeter
“Suicide is a calamity of the inner world, where feelings, memories, and beliefs may brew up hurricane winds of anguish powerful enough to blow someone away.” – John Maltsberger After suicide, there are no second chances. We can’t go back and try a different, or better way, of supporting someone to see if that works instead. We may have just the one chance to get it right, and none of us wants to get it wrong. “No one is killing themselves on my watch!” we may vow. And yet a million people worldwide kill themselves each year. If a million people every year died as a result of terrorism, imagine the outcry, the public attention, the funding, and the need for a solution. Research reveals a fair bit about the risk factors for suicide. But does that information enable us to predict with any accuracy whether our client, or friend, or family member will attempt to kill themselves?

This course will look at a variety of issues around self-harm and suicidality, specifically behaviours resulting from states of extreme distress linked to trauma. The aim of the day is to build your confidence in working with or supporting people who are severely distressed, and to equip you to work as effectively as possible to promote recovery and healing from this distress, so that self-harm and suicide are no longer seen as ‘the only way out’. We’ll look at questions such as:

* How can you tell if someone is imminently suicidal – is it even possible? – and what should you then do about it?
* How can we help someone who is suicidal without getting stuck in a battle of life and death?
* Is someone suicidal ‘mentally ill’? Do they have ‘mental capacity’?
* Why do some people self-harm? Is it just ‘attention-seeking’? In what way might it make sense at a neurobiological level?
* Does self-harm increase or decrease the risk of completed suicide?
* Do policies to prevent suicide actually work? Or might they actually be increasing the risk?
* How can we help people who are in severe distress without them becoming too ‘dependent’?
* Do we have a duty to report suicidal intentions, and what are the legal ramifications if we don’t?
* Does hospitalisation work? Or does it make things worse?
* What can we actually DO to help people feel better?

This course, aimed principally at counsellors and psychotherapists, but also suitable for a wide range of professionals and indeed anyone supporting survivors of trauma, will look at how to work safely and effectively with self-harm and suicide: to cope with crisis and deal with distress.

This will be a day full of hope from recovery from even extreme and enduring states of distress. Attendees of this course will receive a CPD certificate for 6 hours, along with an extensive delegate pack including a free resource related to the course.

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